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Bipolar Disorder in Troubled Teens

Bipolar Disorder in Troubled Teens

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It is not unheard of for Bipolar Disorder (formally know as Manic Depression) to develop in someone after childhood, so it can be a surprising upheaval when symptoms suddenly manifest themselves in what used to be a complacent adolescent.  Troubled teens struggling with Bipolar Disorder have extremely difficult times maintaining normalcy, for their behavior is simply out of their control.  C.A.R.E. Schools employ qualified, caring clinicians who can pharmacologically and therapeutically help stabilize a troubled teen suffering from Bipolar Disorder.  Please call (866)492-9215 to speak with our informative admissions counselors today.

Bipolar Disorder is episodic in nature, characterized by shifts in mood from crippling depression to feelings of elation and excitement.  Episodes of depression and mania are difficult to live through, and in some cases may even lead to death through suicide, self-neglect or accident.  Preventative measures must be taken, and troubled teens with Bipolar Disorder should receive the utmost care and support to reach a healthy, stable ground where chances of relapse are greatly minimized.  There are several different types of Bipolar Disorder, some more severe than others where psychosis and hypomania are prevalent, but major aspects of any type most always include periods of intense irritability, frenzied activity, heightened consciousness, and neuroticism while the depressiveness factors in overwhelming melancholia, bereavement, anguish and low self-esteem.  If your troubled teen is showing any of these signs, please get a professional evaluation immediately.

Seeing how many of the brilliant, innovative minds of the past had this condition, the stigma of Bipolar Disorder should be removed, for there is no shame in a genetic, predisposed condition.  Virginia Wolfe, Edgar Allen Poe, Friedrich Nietzsche, Isaac Newton, Frank Sinatra, even Robert Downey Jr. and many other successful people have suffered from Bipolar Disorder, and it is mused that the illness lends itself to creativity.  There are outlets for troubled teens with Bipolar Disorder to express the plethora of emotions and thoughts that wrack their minds, and C.A.R.E. Schools can help.

If you as a parent are through with the chaos and pandemonium that comes with raising a troubled teen with Bipolar Disorder, consider C.A.R.E. Schools the perfect tool to get your child's life back on track.  Please call our kind admissions counselors to learn more about our special programs at (866)492-9215.

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Restore Troubled Teens (RESTORE) represents a consortium of therapeutic schools programs that have the goal to help troubled teens overcome a wide variety of issues from which many of today's adolescents suffer. We work with families of teens who are struggling with emotional, psychological and behavioral problems that require a residential setting to effectively treat these issues. Mood disorders (depression, bipolar, suicidal thoughts), anxiety, sexual addictions, eating disorders, adoption issues, substance abuse and addiction, various learning disabilities, ADD & ADHD, oppositional defiance, attachment disorders, psychosexual disorders, and PTSD are some of the more common issues that are treated by RESTORE recommended schools. Serving families from all 50 States: Alaska (AK), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Arizona (AZ), California (CA), Colorado (CO), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Iowa (IA), Idaho (ID), Illinois (IL), Indiana (IN), Kansas (KS), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Massachusetts (MA), Maryland (MD), Maine (ME), Michigan (MI), Minnesota (MN), Missouri (MO), Mississippi (MS), Montana (MT), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Nebraska (NE), New Hampshire (NH), New Jersey (NJ), New Mexico (NM), Nevada (NV), New York (NY), Ohio (OH), Oklahoma (OK), Oregon (OR), Pennsylvania (PA), Rhode Island (RI), South Carolina (SC), South Dakota (SD), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Utah (UT), Virginia (VA), Vermont (VT), Washington (WA), Wisconsin (WI), West Virginia (WV), Wyoming (WY),